Rosewood luxury resort in China

Rosewood Luang Prabang’s New Luxury Resort in China plus Ancient Wonders in Laos – $1,200 a night

Rosewood Luang in China is Prabang’s newest luxury resort and promises a stay like no other. The ancient wonders of Laos are close at hand serving up a cultural bonanza and insight into the rich culture surrounding the area. The Laotian mountains, the stunning Mekong sunset and the eighth wonders of the world combined with the exquisite luxury creating Southeast Asia’s most desirable destination for those into culture, breathtaking landscapes and relaxation. Laos’s former royal capital was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1995, and it’s not hard to tell why. The quaint and picturesque town is snuggly nestled at the base of the forested mountains that tower over the town and Mekong River.

The luxury resort was created and designed by the renowned American architect Bill Bensley, whose signature style is based on taking a concept and stretching it beyond imagination. His vision was of an early 20th-century Laotian hill station, which is the basis of this innovative resort.

Rosewood Luang Prabang tents

Rosewood Luang Prabang views

Rosewood Luang Prabang bedroom

The Luang Prabang started operations just a few months ago. The Rosewood luxury retreat resort features 23 villas, spacious suites and even tents. All the accommodation options have splendid mountain views and are furnished and decorated individually and uniquely. The resort is a short ten-minute drive from the old village centre and offers easy access to all the beautiful and inspiring destinations dotted around the area.

The resort has been tastefully designed to celebrate the rich culture of the Luang Prabang province and showcase the diversity of the tribes, travellers and explorers who passed through the area leaving their mark. Frenchman Auguste Pavie was such an explorer. In the late 1800s, he actually managed to become the governor of Luang Prabang. The resort celebrates the adventurous travels of many other explorers of note who used the Mekong river in the 1860s.

The resort’s hilltop tents are a throwback to a bygone era. The six tents measure 75 square metres each, and each one is dedicated to one of the tribes that used to live on the location. The tents have an ornate décor, with distinctive ethnic textiles and original antiques. In fact, all the rooms have artifacts and ornaments that tell their own stories and have their own history.